Parents
Introduction Interventions Web Links and Downloads

Medical services may include:

  • Physical therapy-for muscle tone "normalization" (children may have a combination of hypotonia and hypertonia), gait training for delays in walking.

  • Occupational therapy-for sensory integration training, cognitive therapy, fine motor skills training, abstract thinking skills and problem-solving skills for doing school work.

  • Speech pathology-for sucking and feeding assistance in infants; speech training for children who are speech delayed.

  • Audiology-for assessments to determine if hearing is impaired; assistive devices if impairment is diagnosed. Note: Some children with FASD may appear to have hearing problems, but the actual problem is that they can't sequence information. So if you tell them a three-step sequence of something to do, they'll get "lost" after the first step. This may come across as hearing impairment, but it's actually a cognitive deficit to be addressed.

  • Neurology-for assessment and treatment of brain and neural damage caused by alcohol exposure in utero. Children with FASD often have seizures, tics and other related neurological problems.

  • Optometry-for assessment (and treatment, if needed) for strabismus, amblyopia, and related conditions (often due to weak or underdeveloped eye muscles). Note: Some children with FASD may appear to have visual problems, but the actual problem is that they can't filter out extraneous information to focus on pertinent information. For example, they may not be able to "see" 2 +5 = 7 on a blackboard that has a lot of other things written on it-unless the teacher physically points to it while talking about it.

 

 

The Academic Edge, Inc. All Rights Reserved. About | Legal | Privacy